“The Second Cooler” Documentary Now Available for Download or Purchase on DVD!

Tomorrow, November 2nd, will mark Mexico’s Day of the Dead celebration. It’s a festive holiday in which families decorate cemeteries and build colorful altars that they fill with flowers, candles, food, and pictures of departed loved ones.

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One of the main purposes of the holiday is to remember and honor the dead, and so it is fitting that Rev. Dr. Ellin Jimmerson’s immigration justice documentary The Second Cooler / La segunda nevera will be released for public purchase on this day.

One of the main purposes of Jimmerson’s film is to remember the dead, specifically, the thousands of immigrants who have died in the deserts of the U.S./Mexico border in their attempt to come to the United States. The film’s title refers to the additional morgue refrigerator, or “second cooler” that the Pima County, Arizona Medical Examiner’s Office had to build to accommodate the remains of unidentified migrants recovered from the desert.

The Second Cooler, narrated by Martin Sheen and dotted with colorful artwork and beautiful original music, is a kind of altar to the memories of these lost and forgotten souls. The film not only seeks to bring them into our collective memory, but it also demands that we consider why so many die in a desperate attempt to come to this country. Second-Cooler-Poster

The film explains how economic and political forces, particularly the NAFTA free trade agreement, created an economic crisis that impoverished Mexican farmers and drove them off their land and into migration. It also tackles the broken immigration system, which leaves many with no legal avenue for immigration and the abuses of the guest worker program, which trap some migrant workers in situations that are not far removed from slavery and human trafficking.

This film is a must-see for anyone interested in knowing more about the dynamics that have caused the influx of immigration that has happened since the passage of NAFTA, and for how the U.S. and its policies have helped create tremendous suffering in Mexico and Central America. The film is an eye opening journey that takes the viewer through political policy, Alabama textile towns, farms that exploit guest workers, Mexican factories on the border, Arizona deserts, and the Pima County Medical Examiner’s office to reveal the human cost of the current system.

Today only (Nov. 1, 2015), you can pre-order The Second Cooler and its soundtrack for a discounted price. Beginning tomorrow, Nov. 2nd, the film will be available for download and for purchase on DVD at regular price. I highly recommend purchasing  the film’s excellent original soundtrack, because all of the songs briefly featured in the film deserve a complete listen on their own. I also recommend the film for Spanish teachers like myself because it is completely bilingual, with interviews and subtitles in both Spanish and English.

Please help support this amazing project!

Price listing for Digital Download Packages (Regular pricing applies beginning Nov. 2, 2015):

Basic Package reg. $19.99 will be $11.99
Deluxe Package reg. $24.99 will be $14.99
Boxed Set Edition reg. $44.99 will be $26.99
Soundtrack reg. $4.99 will be $2.99
Unedited interviews reg. $2.99 will be $1.79

Price listing for DVD/CD Orders:

DVD regularly $24.99 only $14.99
Soundtrack CD regularly $6.99 only $4.33

Please visit The Second Cooler website to find out more or to place an order.

One final note: I had the privilege of helping in minor ways with the production of this documentary, but I have chosen not to receive any compensation for my work. I am sharing this post because I believe in the importance of Dr. Jimmerson’s work on immigration advocacy and social justice.

If you believe in the importance of this cause, please support The Second Cooler and share this post with your friends!

How I Found Gay Cuban Jesus and became an LGBTQ-Affirming Christian

When I was a senior in college (that is, 15 years ago now), I took a Hispanic literature and film class in which we watched the Cuban movie Strawberry and Chocolate. It was an uncomfortable experience for me.

I didn’t know what to expect from the film because as a fledgling reader of Spanish, I hadn’t made much headway with the short novel that the film is based on (The Wolf, the Forest, and the New Man by Senel Paz). For starters, I was a little shocked and embarrassed by a brief but strong (and very hetero) sex scene at the beginning of the film, and I remember surreptitiously glancing around at my classmates, thinking, “Did I really just see that in class?”

What followed left me even more unsettled, but for different reasons: A gay man (Diego) makes a play for a young straight man (David), and through various twists and turns of the plot, the two of them develop a genuine friendship and respect for one another. At the end of the film, they share an emotional embrace as Diego prepares to leave the country because of the communist regime’s repression of intellectual freedom and persecution of LGBTQ people.Screenshot 2015-02-04 15.18.58

It has been 15 years, but I still remember how that embrace bothered me. Despite the bright Cuban sunshine streaming in through the window, the act seemed sinister and threatening. Worrisome. The big bad wolf had somehow managed to get friendly with little Red Riding Hood, and that wasn’t how the story was supposed to end.

I didn’t really understand the film, but I knew that it contradicted what I had been taught: that homosexuality is a sin and that it should not be normalized and promoted, much less embraced. The film got under my skin despite the fact that Diego’s initial ploy to seduce David does not succeed; as Roger Ebert noted in his review of the film, Strawberry and Chocolate “is not a movie about the seduction of a body, but about the seduction of a mind.” At the time, I guess I was not quite prepared for either possibility.

This all happened before the term “gay agenda” gained traction, and before a one’s stance on homosexuality and same-sex marriage became such an important litmus test in certain circles for whether or not one is a “true” believer and practitioner of the Christian faith. In fact, the topic of homosexuality seemed distant and almost unreal as I grew up in rural south Georgia, far from the epicenters of the AIDS epidemic and blithely ignorant of any gay subtexts in the Queen songs that I learned from listening to the radio with my older brothers.

Homosexuality was a sin, but from my sheltered perspective it was a theoretical one, like making sacrifices to pagan gods . . . who did that? Not anyone that I knew! A year or two into college, I did have a bisexual friend (one of my best, in fact), but I was conveniently spared from having to confront the issue when she started dating a guy shortly after we met.

In this context, I wasn’t exactly homophobic, and I didn’t hate or gay-bash LGBTQ folks (that is, the two or three whom I knew at that point), but nevertheless, when I was suddenly confronted with having to think and write about gay men and their stories (we also read and watched Kiss of the Spider Woman), I was profoundly unsettled by the contradictions between what I believed and what I felt, and I was caught between the impulse to identify with the characters or to keep them at arm’s length as foreign and possibly dangerous others.

So, you could say that Diego was the first (albeit fictional) person to seriously challenge my beliefs on homosexuality and LGBTQ people, and that first time around, I couldn’t identify with him. I couldn’t accept that final embrace.

Several years later and quite a bit farther down the road of my Christian journey, I decided to rewatch Strawberry and Chocolate when I was choosing films for a Hispanic cultures class (mostly, I confess, because it was one of only two Cuban films that I had ever seen).

I was looking for relevant cultural content for my students, but what I found instead was Jesus.

Gay Cuban Jesus, to be precise.

That, and a change of heart.

As I rewatched (and then re-rewatched) Strawberry and Chocolate, I came not only to identify with Diego, but to love and respect him just as David, his young straight friend in the film, does. I learned to see his goodness and passion, and to see the evil of the regime that oppresses him and ultimately forces him to leave the country that he loves. I also noticed something that I think I completely missed the first time around: Diego’s identity in the film is not limited to that of gay man, or even that of passionate, oppressed intellectual.

Diego is also a creyente, a believer . . . one might even go so far as to call him a Christian. Not quite the same variety as most of us, for sure, but a believer nonetheless. When I first saw the film, I hadn’t known what to make of his odd relationship with the statue of his patron saint, or with the troubling and potentially sacrilegious statue of Jesus that is hidden under a sheet in his apartment, waiting to be shown at an art exhibition.

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The statue is a fairly standard representation of Jesus, but it is pierced in several places by the communist sickle, resulting in an image that I originally saw as a statement against Christ and Christianity on the part Diego’s artist friend, who is also gay. Oh boy, did I miss the point.

The statue is more likely a criticism of the communist regime that restricted religious practice and that spied on, discriminated against, and even persecuted people of faith . . . just like it spied on, discriminated against, and persecuted gay men like Diego.

Regardless of his love of Cuba and his desire to contribute to its betterment, Diego is pierced over and over by rejection and censorship. When he takes too firm of a stand for artistic freedom, his life, like the plan for the exhibition of the Jesus statue, is ruined. Diego, like the subversive statue of Christ, is forced to exist in hiding. When he objects, he loses his job and is blacklisted and forced into exile away from the country that he has loved so dearly . . . and that he still loves despite the rejection and persecution that he has suffered at its hands.

Kind of like Jesus, still loving the people who nailed him to a cross.

At one point in the film, Diego insists, “I am a part of this country, like it or not, and I have a right to work for its future! . . . Without me, you’re missing a piece!”

He was right . . . the Revolution lost something when it silenced his voice, when it ostracized him and forced him into exile.

How many LGBTQ people have been silenced or exiled by the church? What suffering have we caused, and what have we lost as a result?

How many times have Christians done the persecuting? How many times have we been the Romans with nails, the ideologues with sickles?

And how many times have we excused ourselves by talking about “sin” when none of us has the right to cast stones?

This is not a post about whether homosexual behavior is sinful or not (if you want to read more on that, check here, here, or here). This is a post, in part, about why “sin” isn’t the point.

The point is that people of faith–gay and straight and both and neither–are all part of the church. We all deserve the chance to be in community and to contribute to the future of our faith. We all lose when we exclude and ostracize others who want to be in community.

The point is also that LGBTQ people are just that, people, who have stories that we need to hear, respect, and find ourselves in. When I took a step back from my ideology and really listened to Diego’s story, I could no longer find it in myself to reject and condemn him. In the end, like David, I was seduced . . . not by “sin,” but by Diego’s quirky, passionate, flawed, and honest humanity. By the person behind the label.

Through Diego and David’s story, I understood how I was part of the regime–how I was the crucifier, not the crucified. I realized that I was on the wrong side.

I finally found the joy of that embrace, a joy which has been translated in my life from the fiction of a film to friendships that I treasure and people that I love.

Thank you for that, Diego. Thank you for being my gay Cuban Jesus.


This post is dedicated to my LGBTQ friends and students, and to the first same-sex couples being officially married in the state of Alabama today. Love wins!  


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